Tag Archives: Metal Coil

Architects’ Notes: The Differences Between Galvalume And Galvanized In Metal Roofing Projects

Englert’s nationwide team of architectural sales reps spend a considerable amount of time each year counseling architects on which standing seam metal roofing products and profiles might work best for their design projects.  One of the questions most frequently asked by architects is: What are the differences between  Galvalume and Galvanized Steel when used in roofing. It comes up so often, we thought we’d take a few minutes and use this week’s blog to explain those differences.

First, a little bit of background. Galvalume® was invented by Bethlehem Steel in 1972. It is a trademarked name, but many people use it as a generic term to describe a metal roofing product consisting of  steel coil coated with a metal alloy. That alloy is 45% zinc and 55% aluminum and looks similar to galvanized steel, but the visible crystals are smaller and close together, giving it a smoother appearance.  Galvalume has a cousin, Galvalume Plus. The only difference is Plus has a thin, clear acrylic coating. Because Galvalume Plus can be roll-formed dry without vanishing oil, it is very easy to form and install safely.Galvalume metal roof peak with snow guards.

The combination of zinc and aluminum in Galvalume enhances both the positive and negative effects of aluminum.  Galvalume has barrier corrosion resistance and heat resistance similar to aluminized material and good bare edge galvanic protection and forming qualities like galvanized material. Consequently, Galvalume  and Galvalume Plus will resist rust, the elements and fire while providing a sturdy and protective covering.

Galvalume® is more corrosion-resistant than galvanized steel, but because aluminum provides barrier protection instead of galvanic protection, scratches and cut edges are less protected.  Galvalume is offered in both bare and pre-coated versions. Most Galvalume®–like galvanized steel– is coated. But Galvalume has an excellent performance life in bare exposures as well.  Both galvanized steel and Galvalume® weigh 100 to 150 pounds per 100 square feet and contain about 35% recycled materials. The cost of Galvalume and Galvalume Plus are about the same as that of galvanized steel. Continue reading

Metal and Coatings Are Important: But the Paintline and the People Who Run It Will Make the Difference

Everyone always talks about the quality of their aluminum and steel in metal construction and the importance of using a high end coating.

But very rarely do you hear anyone talk about a third key element in the manufacture of a quality metal roofing or wall product—the paint line on which it is made. Virtually every aspect of a paint line plays a critical role in the final quality of the product. Following is a quick visit to a modern paint line with a look at why a state of the art manufacturing operation is critical to the production of a superior product and to the economies of cost in producing it.

Paint line systems built within the past few years are environmentally superior. They capture 100 percent of solvent fumes from painting, drying and curing operations and recover virtually all of the heat from the burning solvent for return to the process in an ultra-clean system.Metal coil paintline.

Newer paint lines have systems  that can heat their ovens and metal cleaning and pretreatment operations with no cost, saving  a substantial amount of energy which otherwise would have to be built into the cost of the product. Their environmental systems burners destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and solvents in their incinerator. The heat from there is passed through for heating ovens and the boiler which creates steam heat for the cleaner and rinse tanks. Then fresh air from the coater rooms is passed through the heat exchanger and into the incinerator to be burned to complete the loop. Any excess heat is then pumped out through the stack.

Modern paint lines have an oven and incinerator with one burner along the entire line, producing the highest grade of painted metal possible. Oven heat in these modern systems is better balanced internally to give a better product with color that is uniform across the entire roll. Samples of whites produced in older, multiple-burner manufacturing systems can have a yellow cast across the width of the strip because the heat is stronger on one side of the burner than the other. The new systems set the highest standard in the industry for quality, color and consistency. Continue reading

Metal Roofing Contractors Can Avoid Cinching AKA Friction Scratches With These Simple Rollforming Tips

Cinching, sometimes also referred to as “friction scratches” or “pickoff,” is the result of the movement or slipping of painted coil laps against each other on a rollforming machine.

This phenomenon can be frustrating to metal roofing contractors because it causes the removal of paint in the shape of small or medium sized scratches on metal roofing coil formed in the same direction of the slipping or movement of the coil laps.

Some clear signs that cinching is the cause of these short longitudinal scratches are:
•    Worn or broken pieces on the spools, idler rolls and guides,
•    Gaps or air spaces between sections of the laps of the coil
•    The ability to move the laps of coil with hand pressure, a sure sign that coil has unraveled.

Cinched metal roofing panel.The vast majority of cinching incidents are caused by improper brake pressure on the un-coiler spool or the expandable arbor brake on the rollforming machine.  For portable roll formers, the improper brake pressure on the un-coiler spool is by far the source of most cinching. And new machine operators not familiar with the use of the brake or trained incorrectly are responsible for most of the problems.

To avoid cinching, the rollforming machine operator must make sure there is proper tension to allow the coil to uncoil without tightening the laps or without loosening the coil so it does not unravel. If either of these actions occurs, the laps will rub against each other and cause cinching. Continue reading

Manufacturing Metal Roof Systems More Efficiently On the Job Site With Portable Roll Forming Machines

Standing seam metal roof panels are formed for a project in one of two ways— directly at the job site using a portable roll former or off site at a factory and transported by truck to the job site.

When on-site portable roll forming first appeared on the scene more than 25 years ago, the sellers of factory formed panels saw the threat of losing business to metal roofing companies that formed the metal roof panels at the job site using portable roll forming equipment that provided greater flexibility and job control.  These in plant manufacturers began to make a lot of noise about the perceived disadvantages of on-site manufacturing.  Their unfounded claims were that on-site roll forming was too new and lacked a proven track record.   They focused a great deal of time and effort trying to disparage and eliminate the competition from on-site metal roofing fabricators.

Despite their great protestations, job site roll forming has thrived and millions of metal roofs have been installed using portable roll forming machines.  In fact, during the intervening years metal roofing projects completed using portable roll forming equipment have not received any more complaints than those projects that were completed using factory formed panels.  In many cases the advantages with respect to flexibility and increased job control resulting from the more efficient on-site roll forming process drew raves from GC’s, Architects and Building Owners.

Recently, times have been tough in the building industry—we all know that. And twenty five years later the sellers of factory-made panels are feeling the pinch and protesting again—from their factories, hundreds and sometimes thousands of miles from the job site where their roofing panels are being installed.

Twenty five years later, they’re still obsessed with the competition and still complaining about product reliability issues which were clearly never an issue in the first place. Meanwhile, job site roll formers have proven to have several distinct advantages over factory-made panels.

Unlike sellers of the factory formed panels, they don’t store piles of standing seam metal roof panels at the job site only to wait until other crafts have completed their work before roof installation can begin. They don’t leave panels exposed to inclement weather. They don’t have to worry about possible shipping and job site damage.  And they never have to worry that the panels will be too long or too short or that there weren’t enough panels manufactured and sent to the job site in the first place.


Conversely, job site roll formers are able to accommodate last minute changes in plans without waiting several days for the factory to take the order, make the new panels and ship them back to the job site.  Meanwhile, sophisticated roll forming machines allow contractors to punch in 50 different programs and get a series of different panel lengths in sequence.  Today’s contractors produce panel lengths in batches—without touching the unit.

Polyurethane drive rollers drive all materials up to 24 gauge steel through a machine with ease.  A wide variety of materials are run through the machine, with little or no adjustments.

The use of AutoCAD and CAD in the machine design process has resulted in shorter machines that produce finished panels and gutter systems in record time.

And… due to the resulting quality and efficiency more and more architects and GCs are turning to on site metal roof fabricators as the preferred choice to manufacture their clients metal roof systems.

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